Surviving Great Days

August 1983
The cool air stirred and the long rays of morning sun greeted the three of us as we walked the long driveway. It took everything in me not to start crying.

“Today’s a great day!” I said, with too much pep in my voice. I wanted to make sure I told him all he needed to know for this special day. “You’ll meet new people and it’ll be terrific!”

We continued to walk, hand in hand as we always had in the past. He stopped, looked up into my eyes, and with a sober voice, “It is a great day, right, Mommy?”

Little Sis skipped along singing Great day, It’s gonna be a great day … She had no idea the somberness of this moment. But how could she? How could she know what it felt like to lose a baby into an Unknown World?

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Start a New Christmas Tradition with Red Pen Redemption by Lori Roeleveld

Red Pen RedemptionLooking to start a new tradition? Here’s my review for Lori Roeleveld’s book, Red Pen Redemption. See what you think. Consider adding this to your December experiences.

Would you be bold enough to challenge God with your life? Helen Bancroft did in Lori Roeleveld’s, Red Pen Redemption.

It’s a story of Helen’s self-justification and self-indulgence. She is both hero and villain. I loved her and hated her. I wanted to reach through the pages and shake her by her shoulders, then I wanted to hug her close to protect her. Ironically, it wasn’t until I was closing into the end of the story that I realized I had seen myself—my own life—reflected in parts of this story.

Roeleveld’s use of scripture soothed, guided, and enticed me as a reader. She also expertly offered example after example how Helen tried to look God in the proverbial face, only to blink and turn away. Just as I had tried in the past, and if you dare to read this, you may see yourself, too.

I rarely give five stars ratings. I think five-stars are reserved for mothers to give their children. But this book has what it takes to change lives. A tall order for a piece of fiction. Lori Roeleveld’s, Red Pen Redemption is slated to be a beloved Christmas Season staple for years to come.

Battling the Why Me’s

American President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 - 1945) poses with his dog Fala and a young girl named Ruthie Bie (later Ruth Bautista) on the porch at Top Cottage, Hyde Park, New York, February 1941. Bie was the granddaughter of the property caretaker, and the photo is one of only two that show Roosevelt in his wheelchair. (Photo by Margaret Suckley/PhotoQuest/Getty Images)

American President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 – 1945) poses with his dog Fala and a young girl named Ruthie Bie (later Ruth Bautista) on the porch at Top Cottage, Hyde Park, New York, February 1941. Bie was the granddaughter of the property caretaker, and the photo is one of only two that show Roosevelt in his wheelchair. (Photo by Margaret Suckley/PhotoQuest/Getty Images)

Life sometimes don’t turn out as we plan. It begins uneventful enough, just as we think it should. No ripples. No bumps in the road. Smooth sailings all the way. Then on a dime, something happens to change the trajectory forever. Joni Eareckson-Tada dove into shallow water and broker her neck, leaving her a quadriplegic. At the height of his popularity, Franklin D. Roosevelt was stricken with polio. When Bethany Hamilton was fourteen, she took her surfboard to catch a few waves and was attacked by a shark, losing her arm.

When tragedy happens, our lives–and faith–can be rocked.  How could a loving God let this happen? Why did this have to happen to me?

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